kitchenklutz: knife and onions (knife and onions)
For the last month and a half -- call it work busy-ness, call it Thanksgiving burnout, call it flu season -- I've been singularly unmotivated to try out or post new recipes. Thankfully, I think that period of culinary blah has finally begun to move on.

So, I'll begin anew with Emeril's Spicy Meatloaf )

Overall, I was very favorably impressed by this recipe. The meatloaf is solid and flavorful, and the varied hot spices and veggies in it were enough to make my brow break out in sweat. Incredibly tasty, and with quite a few reasonably-sized servings -- I'll definitely be making this again. Overall prep time was about 30 - 45 minutes, and then the additional cook time of nearly an hour, means one needs a decent span of time to get everything together... but it's certainly worth it, in my opinion.
kitchenklutz: tomato sauce ladle (saucy ladle)
Last night after a mediocre day, I was in the mood for comfort food. I already had some tortilla chips, but was lacking salsa to go with it. Not wanting to spend more money at the grocery when I had plenty of ingredients here, I chose to make a recipe from my Emeril's Potluck cookbook (page 6) -- slightly modified, for a little extra zing.

Simply Salsa )

This turned out pleasantly tasty, though perhaps not quite as immediately hot on the palate as I might have preferred. It had a nice afterburn on the tongue, but it required a lot of addition of various ground peppers to reach it. I'll have to tinker with the recipe (and remember to drain the canned whole tomatoes next time) and see whether it can be improved.
kitchenklutz: knife and onions (knife and onions)
An old favorite recipe of mine is Mongolian beef, gotten from a friend on LiveJournal. I also found a recipe for Mongolian hoisin sauce in my new Martin Yan's China cookbook, so I decided to try making my old recipe with this new sauce.



Mongolian Beef (with Choice of Sauces) )

Regardless of which sauce you choose, this is an absolutely savory recipe with some spicy bite. (Personally, I prefer the oyster-bean sauce over Yan's Mongolian hoisin sauce recipe. This is mostly because 1/3 cup of hoisin sauce is the bulk of an 8-oz. bottle from the market -- and at $3.29/bottle, I'd rather use small quantites of varied sauces and make my condiments last.)

You can serve this with rice, with noodles, or just by itself as a snack -- incredibly tasty.

Crossposted from Kitchenklutz.

Profile

kitchenklutz: spoons and bowls (Default)
kitchenklutz

March 2015

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15 161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags